Home | About us | Editorial board | Search | Ahead of print | Current issue | Archives | Submit article | Instructions | Subscribe | Contacts | Advertise | Login 
 
Search Article 
  
Advanced search 
  Users Online: 206 Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 194-197

Hyperparathyroidism revisited - Old wine in new bottles!


1 Department of General Surgery, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Porur, Chennai, India
2 Department of Intern, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Porur, Chennai, India
3 Department of Pathology, Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute, Porur, Chennai, India

Correspondence Address:
Sujatha Narayana Moorthy
617, G2, Sri Ramana Apts., 9th Sector, 51st Street, K. K. Nagar, Chennai - 600 078
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.83405

Rights and Permissions

Aim: Hyperparathyroidism (HPT) is a condition that occurs due to exacerbated activity of the parathyroid glands. According to the etiology it may be primary, secondary or tertiary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT, sHPT, tHPT). This is a study done to document and evaluate the presentations of primary and secondary HPT, with the associated complications and the approach to management in these patients, at our hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with HPT were encountered at Sri Ramachandra Medical College and Research Institute between January 2000 and January 2010. Operative notes, histopathology files, and medical records were used for the retrospective analysis of the patients with HPT. Parathormone, calcium, and phosphate levels were estimated on all the patients, to determine the primary or secondary etiology of this endocrine abnormality. Furthermore, these patients were subjected to ultrasonography (USG) of the neck and Technetium (99 mTc) scan of the neck to identify the parathyroid gland. Results: This study revealed that about 76, 19, and 5% of the patients suffered from pHPT, sHPT, and tHPT, respectively, with a female preponderance (62%).The neoplasm in all patients with pHPT was parathyroid adenoma. The patients presented with renal, bony, and menstrual abnormalities. Cases with sHPT had a 15 - 20 year history of chronic kidney disease and they subsequently developed bony abnormalities. Even as all the patients with pHPT were managed with parathyroidectomy, individuals with sHPT were treated conservatively. Postoperative features of hypocalcemia were noted in only one patient. Conclusion: This study re-emphasizes that pHPT is more common and is often due to an adenoma. Recent advances in parathormone sampling operatively and minimal access surgery, along with accurate and prompt clinical diagnosis, is necessary for the cure of these patients presenting with obscure abdominal, bony, and renal ailments.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2156    
    Printed75    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded504    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal