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Year : 2011  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 289-297

Fetal origin of vascular aging


1 Consultant Endocrinologist, Pitale Diabetes and Hormone Center, Shriman Complex, Dhantoli, India
2 Physiology Department, NKPS Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Center, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Shailesh Pitale
Consultant Endocrinologist, Pitale Diabetes and Hormone Center, Shriman Complex, Dhantoli, Nagpur, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.86971

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Aging is increasingly regarded as an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and hypertension and their complications (e.g. MI and Stroke). It is well known that vascular disease evolve over decades with progressive accumulation of cellular and extracellular materials and many inflammatory processes. Metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes are conventionally recognized as risk factors for development of coronary vascular disease (CVD). These conditions are known to accelerate ageing process in general and vascular ageing in particular. Adverse events during intrauterine life may programme organ growth and favour disease later in life, popularly known as, 'Barker's Hypothesis'. The notion of fetal programming implies that during critical periods of prenatal growth, changes in the hormonal and nutritional milieu of the conceptus may alter the full expression of the fetal genome, leading to permanent effects on a range of physiological.


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