Home | About us | Editorial board | Search | Ahead of print | Current issue | Archives | Submit article | Instructions | Subscribe | Contacts | Advertise | Login 
 
Search Article 
  
Advanced search 
  Users Online: 2333 Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size  
REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 246-251

Protein energy wasting in chronic kidney disease: An update with focus on nutritional interventions to improve outcomes


1 Medical Advisor, Cadila Healthcare Limited, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
2 Chairman, Medanta Kidney and Urology Institute, Medanta - The Medicity, Gurgaon (Haryana), India

Correspondence Address:
Yashpal P Jadeja
Medical Advisor, Cadila Healthcare Limited, Zydus Towers, Satellite Cross Roads, Ahmedabad - 380 015, Gujarat
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: Dr. Yashpal Jadeja is an employee of Cadila Healthcare Limited.


DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.93743

Rights and Permissions

Protein-energy wasting (PEW) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). PEW is one of the strongest predictors of mortality in patients with CKD. The International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM) expert panel has defined PEW as a, "state of decreased body stores of protein and energy fuels (body protein and fat masses)". The ISRNM panel has also proposed diagnostic criteria of PEW with four categories. Cachexia is a severe form of PEW. The proposed causes of PEW are multi-factorial and include nutritional and non-nutritional mechanisms. The literature indicates that PEW can be mitigated or corrected with an appropriate diet and enteral nutritional support that targets dietary protein intake. Dietary requirements and enteral nutritional support must also be considered in patients with CKD and diabetes mellitus and in children with CKD, in addition to dialysis patients. Features of ideal dietary supplement have also been discussed. Dietary interventions such as enteral feeding with high-protein meals or supplements might improve the nutritional status and outcomes in dialysis patients.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed6098    
    Printed92    
    Emailed3    
    PDF Downloaded1942    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 22    

Recommend this journal