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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 991-995

Effect of low-glycemic load diet on changes in cardiovascular risk factors in poorly controlled diabetic patients


1 Qazvin Research Center for Social Determinants of Health Science (QRC SDH), Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran
2 Qazvin Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin, Iran
3 Sydney University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Sydney, Australia

Correspondence Address:
Amir Ziaee
Qazvin Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin
Iran
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Source of Support: This study was funded by Qazvin Metabolic Diseases Research Center, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.103010

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Background: One dietary strategy aimed at improving both diabetes control and control of cardiovascular risk factors is the use of low glycemic index diets. These diets have been reported to be beneficial in controlling diabetes, and also increase high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), lower serum triglyceride, and reduce glycated protein. Aim: Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effect of a low glycemic index-low glycemic load (GL = 67-77) diet on lipids and blood glucose of poorly controlled diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: In an intervention study, 100 poorly controlled diabetic patients (age 52.8 ± 4.5 years) who were taking insulin or on oral medication underwent administration of low GL diet (GL = 67-77; energy = 1800-2200 kcal, total fat = 36%, fat derived from olive oil and nuts 15%, carbohydrate = 41%, protein = 22%) for 10 weeks. Patients were recommended to follow their regular lifestyle. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL), HDL, triglyceride, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), weight, and body mass index (BMI) were measured before and 10 weeks after the intervention. Results: Before intervention, initial blood cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were 205.9 ± 21.6 and 181.5 ± 22.2, respectively, and were reduced to 182.6 ± 18.2 and 161.6 ± 16.7, respectively, after 10 weeks intervention (P < 0.001). LDL reduced and HDL increased significantly. The HbA1c percentage reduced by 12% (from 8.85 ± 0.22% to 7.81 ± 0.27%) (P < 0.001), and also their weight significantly reduced from 74.0 ± 5 kg to 70.7 ± 4.6 kg (P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that low GL diet having lower carbohydrate amount and higher fat content is an appropriate strategy in blood lipid and glucose response control of poorly controlled diabetic patients.


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