Home | About us | Editorial board | Search | Ahead of print | Current issue | Archives | Submit article | Instructions | Subscribe | Contacts | Advertise | Login 
 
Search Article 
  
Advanced search 
  Users Online: 1741 Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size  
REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 563-567

Acromegaly: Beyond surgery


Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Churchill Hospital, University of Oxford, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Ashley B Grossman
Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Churchill Hospital, University of Oxford, OX3 7LE
United Kingdom
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: ABG has received consultancy fees and research funding from Novartis, Ipsen and Pfizer, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.113721

Rights and Permissions

Acromegaly is characterized by chronic, excess secretion of growth hormone (GH) from a pituitary adenoma, and elevated hepatic insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels. Significant progress has been made in the development of medical therapies to achieve biochemical and symptomatic control in acromegaly. In this review we discuss the three currently available medical therapies, which include somatostatin analogs, dopamine agonists and pegvisomant. We describe a step-wise approach in which a somatostatin analog is followed by the addition of a dopamine agonist, and then if required the addition of or replacement by pegvisomant. New somatostatin agonists such as pasireotide, and the introduction of new orally-acting somatostatin agonists, should increase the therapeutic choices available in the near future.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1921    
    Printed19    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded550    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal