Home | About us | Editorial board | Search | Ahead of print | Current issue | Archives | Submit article | Instructions | Subscribe | Contacts | Advertise | Login 
 
Search Article 
  
Advanced search 
  Users Online: 4707 Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1073-1077

Type-2 diabetes mellitus and auditory brainstem response


1 Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, J.N. Medical College, AMU, Aligarh, India
2 ENT Specialist, 167 Military Hospital, Pathankot, Punjab, India
3 Department of ENT, J.N. Medical College, AMU, Aligarh, India
4 Department of Medicine, J.N. Medical College, AMU, Aligarh, India

Correspondence Address:
Sheelu S Siddiqi
Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Diabetes and Endocrinology, Faculty of Medicine, J.N. Medical College, AMU, Aligarh
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.122629

Rights and Permissions

Objective: Diabetes mellitus (DM) causes pathophysiological changes at multiple organ system. With evoked potential techniques, the brain stem auditory response represents a simple procedure to detect both acoustic nerve and central nervous system pathway damage. The objective was to find the evidence of central neuropathy in diabetes patients by analyzing brainstem audiometry electric response obtained by auditory evoked potentials, quantify the characteristic of auditory brain response in long standing diabetes and to study the utility of auditory evoked potential in detecting the type, site, and nature of lesions. Design: A total of 25 Type-2 DM [13 (52%) males and 12 (48%) females] with duration of diabetes over 5 years and aged over 30 years. The brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA) was performed by universal smart box manual version 2.0 at 70, 80, and 90 dB. The wave latency pattern and interpeak latencies were estimated. This was compared with 25 healthy controls (17 [68%] males and 8 [32%] females). Result: In Type-2 DM, BERA study revealed that wave-III representing superior olivary complex at 80 dB had wave latency of (3.99 ± 0.24) ms P < 0.001, at 90 dB (3.92 ± 0.28) ms P < 0.001 compared with control. The latency of wave III was delayed by 0.39, 0.42, and 0.42 ms at 70, 80, and 90 dB, respectively. The absolute latency of wave V representing inferior colliculus at 70 dB (6.05 ± 0.27) ms P < 0.001, at 80 dB (5.98 ± 0.27) P < 0.001, and at 90 dB (6.02 ± 0.30) ms P < 0.002 compared with control. The latency of wave-V was delayed by 0.48, 0.47, and 0.50 ms at 70, 80, and 90 dB, respectively. Interlatencies I-III at 70 dB (2.33 ± 0.22) ms P < 0.001, at 80 dB (2.39 ± 0.26) ms P < 0.001, while at 90 dB (2.47 ± 0.25) ms P < 0.001 when compared with control. Interlatencies I-V at 70 dB (4.45 ± 0.29) ms P < 0.001 at 80 dB (4.39 ± 0.34) ms P < 0.001, and at 90 dB (4.57 ± 0.31) ms P < 0.001 compared with control. Out of 25 Type-2 DM, 13 (52%) had diabetic neuropathy, of which 12 (92%) showed abnormal BERA. In nonneuropathic [12 (48%)] only 6 (50%) showed abnormal BERA. Conclusion: Delay in absolute latencies and interpeak latencies by BERA demonstrates defect at level of brainstem and midbrain in long standing Type-2 diabetes subjects, which is more pronounced in those with neuropathy.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1734    
    Printed21    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded363    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 2    

Recommend this journal