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BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 358-359

Can a faulty injection technique lead to a localized insulin allergy?


Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Trinanjan Sanyal
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, IPGME & R, Kolkata
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.119621

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Insulin allergy is a rare occurrence which can present diagnostic and management dilemmas for the clinician. Three types of reaction have been reported: Localized, generalized (systemic), and insulin resistance. All need to be considered in cases of suspected insulin allergy. Adverse reactions to insulin have significantly decreased since the introduction of recombinant human insulin preparations. However, cases with insulin allergy continues to present in the clinic. Symptoms range from local injection site reactions to severe generalized anaphylactic reactions. The case study presented here describes an event of suspected insulin allergy arising out of faulty insulin injection technique.


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