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Table of Contents
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 188-189

Neonatal thyroid screening: Relationship between cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone levels and thyroid stimulating hormone in heel prick sample on 4 th to 7 th day-of-life


Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, Baghdad University, Baghdad, Iraq

Date of Web Publication12-Dec-2014

Correspondence Address:
Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
P.O. Box 55302, Baghdad Post Office, Baghdad
Iraq
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.131773

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How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Neonatal thyroid screening: Relationship between cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone levels and thyroid stimulating hormone in heel prick sample on 4 th to 7 th day-of-life. Indian J Endocr Metab 2015;19:188-9

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Neonatal thyroid screening: Relationship between cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone levels and thyroid stimulating hormone in heel prick sample on 4 th to 7 th day-of-life. Indian J Endocr Metab [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Nov 12];19:188-9. Available from: http://www.ijem.in/text.asp?2015/19/1/188/131773

Sir,

As no statistically significant difference was observed in the mean serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) values obtained from cord blood (CB) and heel prick (HP), the observation addressed by Seth et al.[1] that the same cut-off value for recall can be used for screening of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is really interesting. Accordingly, their option to choose TSH-CB rather than TSH-HP in CH screening program seems justifiable. Seth et al.[1] have reported that using TSH-CB in CH screening program offers the advantages of availability in abundance, ethical appropriateness, and ensures compliance since it can be collected in all new-borns before the discharge in hospital. I presume that there are two additional advantages of that option apart from those addressed by Seth et al.[1] These include the following: (1) The TSH-CB screening program has been found to be not affected by non-thyroidal mothers' diseases, notably toxemia of pregnancy, diabetes mellitus, and positive HIV status. [2] (2) The TSH-CB screening program can be also used as a monitoring tool for the evaluation and control of iodine deficiency disorders in a given population. [2],[3],[4]



 
   References Top

1.
Seth A, Rashmi M, Bhakhri BK, Sekri T. Neonatal thyroid screening: Relationship between cord blood thyroid stimulating hormone levels and thyroid stimulating hormone in heel prick sample on 4 th to 7 th day-of-life. Indian J Endocrinol Metab 2014;18:125-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Ward LS, Kunii IS, de Barros Maciel RM. Thyroid stimulating hormone levels in cord blood are not influenced by non-thyroidal mothers' diseases. Sao Paulo Med J 2000;118:144-7.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Rajatanavin R. Iodine deficiency in pregnant women and neonates in Thailand. Public Health Nutr 2007;10:1602-5.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Velilla TA, Rodríguez CG, Sánchez AB, Portillo CM, de la Vega JA, Cerrato SB, et al. Using newborn congenital hypothyroidism screening specimens to detect iodine deficiency in three regions of Spain. An Pediatr (Barc) 2010;72:121-7.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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