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BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 776-780

Effect of a low-calorie diet on restoration of normoglycemia in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes


1 Department of Clinical Diabetology and Endocrinology, Chellaram Diabetes Institute, Pune, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, Chellaram Diabetes Institute, Pune, Maharashtra, India
3 Department of Biostatistics, Chellaram Diabetes Institute, Pune, Maharashtra, India
4 Department of Research, Chellaram Diabetes Institute, Pune, Maharashtra, India
5 Department of Pathology, Chellaram Diabetes Institute, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Ambika Gopalakrishnan Unnikrishnan
Department of Clinical Diabetology and Endocrinology, Chellaram Diabetes Institute, Lalani Quantum, Pune-Bangalore Highway, Pune, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijem.IJEM_206_17

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Introduction: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is considered to be an inevitably progressive disease. Complex therapies add to the financial and psychological burden. Very low-calorie diets (LCDs) are emerging as an option in the management of type 2 diabetes. Methods: We performed a clinical audit of patients with T2DM who received 12 weeks of LCD. Results: This case series documents that 6 out of 12 participants (median baseline HbA1c 9%) achieved HbA1c level in nondiabetes range with LCD despite stopping all antidiabetes medications. There was an improvement in serum triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, C-Reactive protein, urine microalbumin, liver transaminases, liver fat and the indices of insulin resistance, beta cell secretory capacity, and insulin sensitivity. Conclusion: If long-term follow-up proves sustained benefits, such dietary restriction may be an alternative to more drastic options for reversal of type 2 diabetes. This may also help in changing the treatment perspective of a newly detected T2DM from an incurable and inevitably progressive disease to a potentially reversible disease.


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