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MINI REVIEW
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 205-212

Assessing bone health in children and adolescents


Director, Center for Bone Health, Chief, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, USA

Correspondence Address:
Michael A Levine
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th and Civic Center Boulevard, 11 NWT 30, Philadelphia, PA 19104
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.104040

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During normal childhood and adolescence, the skeleton undergoes tremendous change. Utilizing the processes of modeling and remodeling, the skeleton acquires its adult configuration and ultimately achieves peak bone mass. Optimization of peak bone mass requires the proper interaction of environmental, dietary, hormonal, and genetic influences. A variety of acute and chronic conditions, as well as genetic polymorphisms, are associated with reduced bone density, which can lead to an increased risk of fracture both in childhood and later during adulthood. Bone densitometry has an established role in the evaluation of adults with bone disorders, and the development of suitable reference ranges for children now permits the application of this technology to younger individuals. We present a brief overview of the factors that determine bone density and the emerging role of bone densitometry in the assessment of bone mass in growing children and adolescents.


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