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BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 350-351

Recurrent pregnancy loss in patients with thyroid dysfunction


Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, MGM Medical College, Bihar, India

Correspondence Address:
Debanjali Sarkar
162/163, Shastri N.N Ganguly Road, Howrah - 4, Bihar
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.104088

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Purpose of the Review: Thyroid disturbances are common in women during their reproductive years. Thyroid dysfunction interferes with human reproductive physiology, reduces the likelihood of pregnancy and adversely affects pregnancy outcome, thus becoming relevant in the algorithm of reproductive dysfunction. This review highlights the "gap" in knowledge regarding the contribution of thyroid dysfunction in reproduction. Literature Reviewed: Following implantation, the maintenance of the pregnancy is dependent on a multitude of endocrinological events that will eventually aid in the successful growth and development of the fetus. It is estimated that approximately 8-12% of all pregnancy losses are the result of endocrine factors. Autoimmune thyroid disease is present in around 4% of young females and up to 15% are at risk because they are thyroid antibody-positive. There is a strong relationship between thyroid immunity on one hand and infertility, miscarriage, and thyroid disturbances in pregnancy and postpartum, on the other hand. Even minimal hypothyroidism can increase rates of miscarriage and fetal death and may also have adverse effects on later cognitive development of the offspring. Hyperthyroidism during pregnancy may also have adverse consequences. Summary: Pregnant women with subclinical hypothyroidism or thyroid antibodies have an increased risk of complications, especially pre-eclampsia, perinatal mortality, and miscarriage. Universal screening for thyroid hormone abnormalities is not routinely recommended at present, but thyroid function must be examined in female with fetal loss or menstrual disturbances. Practitioners providing health care for women should be alert to thyroid disorders as an underlying etiology for recurrent pregnancy loss.


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