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BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 8  |  Page : 378-381

Adrenal incidentalomas: A collection of six interesting cases and brief review of literature


Department of Endocrinology, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, Old Rajinder Nagar, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Roopal Panchani
A/7, Rashmi Park, Near Saurabh Park, Subhanpura, Baroda, Gujarat - 390 021
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.104100

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Introduction: Adrenal incidentalomas (AI) are detected in approximately 4-7% of patients in imaging studies. Majority are benign, but careful evaluation is warranted to rule out carcinoma and functional adenomas. Aim: The purpose of presenting these cases is to highlight the approach to management of AI in terms of diagnosis, follow-up, and treatment. Materials and Methods: Seven patients presenting in the endocrine clinic with AI were evaluated for their presenting clinical features and investigated. Results: Case 1 was a 49-year-old female, with adrenal androgen secreting adrenocortical carcinoma with amenorrhoea which was mistaken as menopause. She had minimal hirsutism, which was mistaken as postmenopausal hirsutism. Case 2 was a 39-year-old male, presenting with hyperglycemia found to have Conns' syndrome with aldosterone producing adenoma on routine ultrasound. Case 3 was a 32-year-old male, presenting with gastritis and bloating, where ultrasound showed bilateral large adrenal masses revealed as diffuse large B cell lymphoma on biopsy. Case 4 was a 21-year-old boy, who had pheochromocytoma misdiagnosed as benign intracranial hypertension (HTN). Case 5 was a 59-year-old hypertensive male, presenting with fever had pheochromocytoma with catecholamine excess, producing fever. Case 6 was isolated adrenal tuberculosis who presented with chronic diarrhea. Conclusion: AI are common, though prevalence varies depending on the reason for scanning, the characteristics of the population studied, and the radiological techniques used. Most are non-secreting cortical adenomas. AI should be evaluated both biochemically and radiologically. When a hormonal disorder is suspected clinically, targeted, diagnostic testing for autonomous cortisol secretion, pheochromocytoma, and hyperaldosteronism is indicated.


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