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Year : 2013  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 9  |  Page : 608-611

Pituitary dysfunction in infective brain diseases


Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Chitra Selvan
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research (IPGMER), Kolkata - 700 020, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.123546

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Infectious diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) are increasingly being recognized as important causes of hypopituitarism. Although tuberculosis is the most common agent involved, non-mycobacterial agents like viruses, bacteria, fungus, and protozoa are important causes in our country. Involvement post infections could be due to a strategically located tuberculoma, or pituitary abscess, or meningoencephalitis. Although it might not be reasonable to screen all patients with CNS infections for hypopituitarism, awareness of the possibility and clinical follow-up for suggestive symptoms is required.


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