Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 211--218

Gender differences in 7 years trends in cholesterol lipoproteins and lipids in India: Insights from a hospital database


Rajeev Gupta1, Madhawi Sharma2, Neeraj Krishna Goyal2, Preeti Bansal2, Sailesh Lodha3, Krishna Kumar Sharma4 
1 Department of Internal Medicine, Fortis Escorts Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
2 Department of Laboratory Medicine, Fortis Escorts Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
3 Department of Endocrinology, Fortis Escorts Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India
4 Department of Research, Fortis Escorts Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India

Correspondence Address:
Rajeev Gupta
Department of Internal Medicine, Room 5034, Fortis Escorts Hospital, JLN Marg, Jaipur - 302 017, Rajasthan
India

Objective: To determine gender differences and secular trends in total, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high DL (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides using a large hospital database in India. Methods: All blood lipid tests evaluated from July 2007 to December 2014 were analyzed. Details of gender and age were available. Statin therapy was obtained at two separate periods. Trends were calculated using linear regression and Mantel-Haenszel X2. Results: Data of 67395 subjects (men 49,904, women 17,491) aged 51 ± 12 years were analyzed. Mean levels (mg/dl) were total cholesterol 174.7 ± 45, LDL cholesterol 110.7 ± 38, non-HDL cholesterol 132.1 ± 44.8, HDL cholesterol 44.1 ± 10, triglycerides 140.8 ± 99, and total: HDL cholesterol 4.44 ± 1.5. Various dyslipidemias in men/women were total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dl 25.4/36.4%, LDL cholesterol ≥130 mg/dl 28.1/35.0% and ≥100 mg/dl 54.4/66.4%, non-HDL cholesterol ≥160 mg/dl 25.5/29.6%, HDL cholesterol <40/50 mg/dl 54.4/64.4%, and triglycerides ≥150 mg/dl 34.0/26.8%. Cholesterol lipoproteins declined over 7 years with greater decline in men versus women for cholesterol (Blinear regression = −0.82 vs. −0.33, LDL cholesterol (−1.01 vs. −0.65), non-HDL cholesterol (−0.88 vs. −0.52), and total: HDL cholesterol (−0.02 vs. −0.01). In men versus women there was greater decline in prevalence of hypercholesterolemia (X2trend 74.5 vs. 1.60), LDL cholesterol ≥130 mg/dl (X2 trend 415.5 vs. 25.0) and ≥100 mg/dl (X2 trend 501.5 vs. 237.4), non-HDL cholesterol (X2trend 77.4 vs. 6.85), total: HDL cholesterol (X2 trend 212.7 vs. 10.5) and high triglycerides (X2trend 10.8 vs. 6.15) (P < 0.01). Use of statins was in 2.6% (36/1405) in 2008 and 9.0% (228/2527) in 2014 (P < 0.01). Statin use was significantly lower in women (5.8%) than men (10.3%). Conclusions: In a large hospital - database we observed greater hypercholesterolemia and low HDL cholesterol in women. Mean levels and prevalence of high total, LDL, non-HDL and total: HDL cholesterol declined over 7 years. A lower decline was observed in women. This was associated with lower use of statins.


How to cite this article:
Gupta R, Sharma M, Goyal NK, Bansal P, Lodha S, Sharma KK. Gender differences in 7 years trends in cholesterol lipoproteins and lipids in India: Insights from a hospital database.Indian J Endocr Metab 2016;20:211-218


How to cite this URL:
Gupta R, Sharma M, Goyal NK, Bansal P, Lodha S, Sharma KK. Gender differences in 7 years trends in cholesterol lipoproteins and lipids in India: Insights from a hospital database. Indian J Endocr Metab [serial online] 2016 [cited 2021 Apr 11 ];20:211-218
Available from: https://www.ijem.in/article.asp?issn=2230-8210;year=2016;volume=20;issue=2;spage=211;epage=218;aulast=Gupta;type=0