Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 643--647

Evaluation of accuracy of ambulatory glucose profile in an outpatient setting in children with type 1 diabetes


Anjana Hulse1, Suahma Rai2, KM Prasanna Kumar1 
1 Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Bangalore Diabetes Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Bangalore Diabetes Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka; Department of Paediatrics, P.E.S. Institute of Medical Sciences and Research, Kuppam, Andhra Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Anjana Hulse
#854, 5th A cross, Near Coffee Day, Vijaya Bank Lay Out, Behind IIM, Off Bannerghatta Road, Bengaluru - 560 076, Karnataka
India

Background: In children with type 1 diabetes, intensive diabetes management has been demonstrated to reduce long-term microvascular complications. At present, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) by patients at home and glycated hemoglobin estimation every 3 months are used to monitor glycemic control in children. Recently, ambulatory glucose profile (AGP) is increasingly being used to study the glycemic patterns in adults. However, accuracy and reliability of AGP in children have not been evaluated yet. Objectives: To assess the accuracy of AGP data in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus when compared with laboratory random blood sugar (RBS) levels, capillary blood glucose (CBG) measured by glucometer in the hospital, and SMBG monitored at home. Methods: Paired RBS, CBG, and AGP data were analyzed for 51 patients who wore AGP sensors for 2 weeks. Simultaneous venous and CBG samples were collected on day 1 and day 14. SMBG at home was checked and recorded by the patients for optimizing insulin doses. Accuracy measures (mean absolute deviation, mean absolute relative difference (MARD), and coefficient of linear regression of AGP on RBS, CBG, and home-monitored SMBG were calculated. Results: Seventy paired RBS, CBG, and AGP data and 362 paired home-monitored SMBG and AGP data were available. The MARD was 9.56% for AGP over RBS and 15.07% for AGP over CBG. The linear regression coefficient of AGP over RBS was 0.93 and that of AGP over CBG was 0.89 (P < 0.001). The accuracy of AGP over SMBG was evaluated over four ranges: <75, 76-140, 141-200, and >200 mg/dl. Conclusion: In this study, AGP data significantly correlate with RBS and CBG data in children with type 1 diabetes. However, a large number of samples in a research setting would help to document reproducibility of our results.


How to cite this article:
Hulse A, Rai S, Prasanna Kumar K M. Evaluation of accuracy of ambulatory glucose profile in an outpatient setting in children with type 1 diabetes.Indian J Endocr Metab 2016;20:643-647


How to cite this URL:
Hulse A, Rai S, Prasanna Kumar K M. Evaluation of accuracy of ambulatory glucose profile in an outpatient setting in children with type 1 diabetes. Indian J Endocr Metab [serial online] 2016 [cited 2021 Mar 7 ];20:643-647
Available from: https://www.ijem.in/article.asp?issn=2230-8210;year=2016;volume=20;issue=5;spage=643;epage=647;aulast=Hulse;type=0